Bureau d’Esprit

Our manifesto Is Art an accessory of luxury?

At a time when tastes and styles tend to be standardized, it becomes necessary to cultivate and enhance its personality through force and pertinence.
By interacting with art and culture, the brand image expresses itself utterly, reinforcing its exceptional and distinctive character. Nevertheless, the collaboration between these worlds may seem meaningless if it is not constructed with subtlety. Our object is to reveal the creative potential in line with the brand. We explore its history and its values in order to create audacious links with contemporary design.
Culture has always influenced major developments and contributed to a dynamic and necessary renewal.
Constant affirmation of its origins gives the brand prestige and timelessness. This heritage is the basis of the analysis we want to develop, while updating the brand.

Our Manifesto Is Art an accessory of luxury?

At a time when tastes and styles tend to be standardized, it becomes necessary to cultivate and enhance its personality through force and pertinence. By interacting with art and culture, the brand image expresses itself utterly, reinforcing its exceptional and distinctive character. Nevertheless, the collaboration between these worlds may seem meaningless if it is not constructed with subtlety.

Our object is to reveal the creative potential in line with the brand. We explore its history and its values in order to create audacious links with contemporary design. Culture has always influenced major developments and contributed to a dynamic and necessary renewal. Constant affirmation of its origins gives the brand prestige and timelessness. This heritage is the basis of the analysis we want to develop, while updating the brand.

Sophie Becker Fauconnier

Holder of a post-master diploma in Intellectual Property Law from Pantheon University, specializing in Trademark Law, Sophie Becker worked for nearly 15 years as an image, heritage and communication expert in the world of luxury. Along with these agencies, groups and luxury Maisons, such as LVMH or Lancel, she developed the heritage strategy of the brand, at a time when the luxury industry was exclusively focused on the product. In 2011 she joined Drouot Formation and followed the programme for ‘ specialist consultant in art market’ in order to deepen her knowledge of art history and fashion, and in particular the secondary market of haute couture.

Esprit des lieux

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Portrait de Madame Geoffrin
1738, Jean Marc Nattier, Tokyo, Musée Fuji Art Museum

SOME HISTORY: THE BUREAUX D’ESPRIT

Mme du Deffand, Mme Geoffrin, Julie de Lespinasse, Mme de Tencin…So many famous women who marked the eighteenth century by the way they handled their artistic and literary salons in Paris, which brought together in Paris the most exceptional people of their time and who were influent throughout Europe. It is only from the nineteenth century that the term ‘salon’ is used. Regulars by far preferred the word ‘bureau d’esprit’ – inspired from the bel esprit that qualified the extraordinary constellation of the people of the Enlightenment. The purpose of these select societies was to try and discover and encourage new artistic and intellectual talents, along with organising meetings with the ones already established. These bureaux d’esprit had a decisive impact on society at that time, as they were places for cultural and intellectual freedom and for the crystallisation of an altered and modifying consciousness. (Portrait de Madame Geoffrin 1738, Jean Marc Nattier, Tokyo, Musée Fuji Art Museum)

Like the image of the bureaux d’esprit from the Enlightenment, the Bureau is a ‘laboratory’ for reflection and analysis, allowing to enrich cultural news and create a relevant content, while seeking the most diverse contemporary talents, selected for each project: art historians, curators, set designers, graphic artists, craftsmen, web-designers, musicians, audiovisual producers, dealers, auctioneers, visual artists …